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Fall 2021 Courses

First-Year Inquiry (FYI) classes are for you! These courses, designed for new freshmen/transfers at NC State, feature a small class size (+/-19 students) that encourages active learning and inquiry, develop critical and creative thinking skills, build academic community, and foster a close intellectual relationship between students and faculty. In Fall 2021 we will offer 18 sections of FYI courses. Make sure to register for the section of the course with the “Q” designation. PRINTABLE PDF

An interdisciplinary study of centers of African civilization from antiquity to the 1960s. Such centers include ancient Egypt, Nubia, Axum, Ghana, Mali, Songhai, Kilwa, Malinda, Sofola, Zinzibar, and Monomotapa.

(Section 001Q/MW: 11:45AM-1:00PM)
GEP: Global Knowledge
GEP: Humanities

Study of human evolution. Processes of evolution, human variation and race, behavior and morphology of nonhuman primates, and the fossil record. Emphasis on the study of human biosocial adaptation, past and present, and on humans as culture-bearing primates.

(Section 002Q/ TTh: 1:30-245PM)
GEP: Social Sciences

This course provides both science and non-science students an opportunity to learn about current issues in biotechnology that play a role in our society. Topic areas will include contemporary and historical applications of biotechnology. From alternative fuel sources to the ramifications of the elucidation of the human genome on health care issues, advances in biotechnology are constantly reshaping the world we live in. Students will give presentations and participate in discussions in the classroom, as well as be engaged in the laboratory on a variety of different topics in biotechnology that affects all our lives.

(Section 001Q LEC/T: 8:30-11:15AM)
(Section 201Q LAB/ Th: 8:30-11:15AM)
GEP: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
GEP: Natural Science

(Linked) Interpersonal Communication explores self-concept, language and culture, self-disclosure, active listening, verbal and nonverbal communication, and conflict management. This class is all about relationships! We discuss how we form, maintain, and sometimes end friendships, as well as family, romantic, and workplace relationships. We will examine our own lives, as well as examples from social media, television, movies, and other media. Each week we will enjoy discussions that apply what we learn to real-life examples, as well as methods to improve our relationships.

(Section 002Q/TTh 10:15-11:30AM)
GEP: Social Sciences

(Linked) Significant British authors are chosen from among such figures as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Pope, Austen, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Tennyson, Browning, Bronte, Dickens, Joyce, Eliot, Woolf, and Yeats.

(Section 001Q/MW: 8:30-9:45AM)
GEP: Humanities

A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present, including such central authors as Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Crane, Wharton, Frost, Eliot, Hemingway, Hurston, Faulkner, Wright, O’Connor, and Morrison

(Section 001Q/TTh: 11:45AM-1:00PM)
GEP: Humanities
GEP: U.S. Diversity

(Linked) This course introduces students to the basic components of an entrepreneurial lifestyle in the arts for those interested in starting an arts business. Students explore fundamental issues arts entrepreneurs
encounter and how they can be addressed before the startup process reaches the launch cycle. Students are required to provide their own transportation to and cover the admission costs of off-campus events.

(Section 001Q/TTh 10:15-11:30AM)
GEP: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Food science is an exciting, multidisciplinary career that draws on chemistry, microbiology, and engineering principles to produce, preserve, and protect the foods that we eat every day. This course is designed to help you understand the journey of foods from “farm to fork”, the effect of diet on human health, and the laws governing food labeling and marketing. It’s science you can eat!

(Section 001Q/TTH 11:45AM-1:00PM)
GEP: Natural Science

We will study Medieval civilization as it emerged from the declining Roman Empire through its apogee in the 13thc. Topics include the transition from the classical to the medieval world, the impact of the Germanic influx, the Islamic influence, the Crusades, and the political, economic, and social institutions of the High Middle Ages.

(Section 003Q/TTh: 3:00-4:15PM)
GEP: Global Knowledge
GEP: Humanities

Introductory survey of 19th and 20th century Asia, with attention to Japan, Southeast Asia, India and China.Emphasis on cultural and political crises of the 19th century and revolutionary transformations of the 20th century.

(Section 002Q/TTh: 1:30-2:45PM)
GEP: Global Knowledge
GEP: Humanities

Introductory analysis of the diverse processes of globalization, and an interdisciplinary survey of the social, political, economic, and cultural patterns reflected in the interrelations between various regions of the world. Emphasis on the historical and cultural contexts of debates in current global issues. A foundation course for students preparing an International Studies major or minor.

(Section 005Q/MW: 11:45AM-1:00PM)
GEP: Global Knowledge
GEP: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Climate is changing with potentially catastrophic implications for the Earth and for people. In this course, we discuss how and why the climate is changing and how climate change is affecting and will affect human well-being in society. We draw upon the multiple disciplinary lenses and diverse perspectives needed to evaluate proposed solutions to climate change across multiple dimensions and/or to assess fully the consequences of inaction.

(Section 001Q/TTh: 10:15-11:15AM)
GEP: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Students will learn to listen imaginatively and critically to Western music, from the music of ancient Babylon, grand Parisian opera, and American musical theater to The Beatles, Beyoncé, and Jaden Smith.  Each unit focuses on a framework for understanding music as a reflection of culture and society, including nationalism, spirituality, sexuality, gender, race, and climate change, and draws on music representing a range of style periods, geographies, and aesthetic traditions.  This is a highly interactive course: students write short essays, and complete creative projects, such as developing stagings of musical theater scenes, crafting your own tape-loop recordings, and even writing and performing NCSU vs. UNC song contests in the style of ancient Germanic singers.  No musical background is required.

(MWF  11:45-12:35  ONLINE)
GEP: Global Knowledge
GEP Visual and Performing Arts

We will examine the stylistic development and cultural impact of popular music in the United States from the 1980s to the present. Musical styles discussed include mainstream and alternative rock, metal, pop, country, contemporary R&B, rap, hip-hop, dance music, and electronica. No prior musical knowledge is necessary. Students may be required to provide their own transportation to and cover the cost of an on- or off-campus event.

(Section 001Q/TTh: 3:00-4:15PM)
GEP: Visual and Performing Arts

Introduction to the professional field of recreation by presenting the basic principles, fundamentals and concepts of recreation as related to such factors as recreation history and objectives, sociological and economic aspects of recreation, leadership qualities and facility provision; and settings for organized recreation in modern society.

(Section 002Q/TTh: 11:45AM-1:00PM)
GEP: Social Science

(Linked) Analysis of American political institutions and processes, including the constitution, political culture, campaigns and elections, political parties, interest groups, the media, the president, congress, the federal courts, and public policy. Discussion of contemporary and controversial issues in American politics. Emphasis on placing current issues in comparative and historical perspective where relevant.

(Section 002Q/MWF: 11:45AM- 12:35PM)
GEP: Social Science

This course is designed for the student who wants to learn to think critically and creatively when making decisions taking into consideration a variety of decision-making models across (sub) disciplines. Throughout the course, students will be presented a minimum of 4 models on decision-making and thinking processes across (sub) disciplines to consider when addressing different problems. Questions will be asked of students in a way that will foster critical and creative thinking in order to analyze, process, and identify effective ways for approaching a problem/situation using the models presented.

(Section 002Q/TTh: 8:30AM-9:30AM)
GEP: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

(Linked) World Population and Food Prospects examines the dynamics of population size and food needs production, distribution, and utilization. The course also analyzes the consequences of inadequate nutrition, food choices and efforts to increase the compatibility of effective food production systems.

(Section 002Q/TTh: 4:30-5:45PM)
GEP: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
GEP: Global Knowledge